Skip to Main Content

++

Introduction

++

There are a lot of myths about my injuries. They say I have broken every bone in my body. Not true. But I have broken 35 bones. I had surgery 14 times to pin and plate. I shattered my pelvis. I forget all of the things that have broke.

Evel Knievel

++

Sports injuries can occur during any sporting activity, event, or training session. Injuries can affect a variety of musculoskeletal structures such as muscles, ligaments, and bones. They can be classified by location, type, body side, and injury event.

++

An injury may be categorized as being either an acute injury or an overuse injury depending on the mechanism of injury and the onset of symptoms (Table 4.1). This chapter will review acute injuries, while the subsequent chapter (Chapter 5) will describe overuse injuries.

++

Acute injuries may be due to extrinsic causes (such as a direct blow) as a result of contact with another player or equipment, or intrinsic causes (such as a ligament sprain or muscle tear). As shown in Table 4.1, acute injuries may be classified according to the particular site injured (e.g. bone, cartilage, joint, ligament, muscle, tendon, bursa, nerve, skin) and the type of injury (e.g. fracture, dislocation, sprain, or strain).

++
Table Graphic Jump Location
Table 4.1  

Classification of sporting injuries

 
++

Bone

++

Fracture

++

Fractures may be due to direct trauma such as a blow, or indirect trauma such as a fall on the outstretched hand or a twisting injury. Fractures may be closed, or open (compound), where the bony fragment punctures the skin.

++

Fractures are classified as transverse, oblique, spiral, or comminuted (Fig. 4.1). Another type of fracture seen in athletes, particularly children, is the avulsion fracture, where a piece of bone attached to a tendon or ligament is torn away.

++
Figure 4.1

Types of fracture (a) transverse (b) oblique (c) spiral (d) comminuted

Graphic Jump Location
++

The clinical features of a fracture are pain, tenderness, localized bruising, swelling, and, in some cases, deformity and restriction of movement. Fractures ...

Want remote access to your institution's subscription?

Sign in to your MyAccess profile while you are actively authenticated on this site via your institution (you will be able to verify this by looking at the top right corner of the screen - if you see your institution's name, you are authenticated). Once logged in to your MyAccess profile, you will be able to access your institution's subscription for 90 days from any location. You must be logged in while authenticated at least once every 90 days to maintain this remote access.

Ok

About MyAccess

If your institution subscribes to this resource, and you don't have a MyAccess profile, please contact your library's reference desk for information on how to gain access to this resource from off-campus.

Subscription Options

Clinical Sports Medicine Collection Full Site: One-Year Subscription

Connect to one of the most renowned references in sports medicine and explore all aspects of diagnosis and management of sports-related injuries and physical activity. Subscription includes access to a library of sports medicine videos.

$65 USD
Buy Now

Pay Per View: Timed Access to all of Clinical Sports Medicine Collection

48 Hour Subscription $34.95

Buy Now

Pop-up div Successfully Displayed

This div only appears when the trigger link is hovered over. Otherwise it is hidden from view.